Thursday, June 19, 2014

So, you want to make a Bar of Shampoo!



I'm really not anybody special, but was driven to create a good shampoo bar for my personal use.  I knew I was going to make a lot of test batches so I limited my batches to 1 pound or less.  All the shampoo bars make good body soap, so nothing was wasted, but I recommend if you make a shampoo bar that everybody is raving about it, don't take it for granted that YOU will like it.  Make small batches & change things slowly.  One thing I have learned is that even 1/2% of superfat can make a difference you can feel, not to mention each different oil & combination.

Hair can be so individual even in the same family, so creating a shampoo bar that everybody loves is going to be elusive.

Commercial shampoos MUST contain preservatives.  They often also, contain silicones.

Preservatives are a necessary evil as you do not want a bottle of moldy, bacteria ridden product, yet they ARE poisons.  They kill bacteria & mold.  Bar soap does not need a preservative, as the pH of the bar is on the high side & the very texture of it helps prevent the growth of nasties in your product.

Silicons make your hair artificially beautiful.  Dry, damaged, color treated hair is usually quite porous & the silicon patches the damage on the hair like a plastic coating.  Looks great, feels smooth, but it's an artificial bandaid.  It's hard to rinse off, so it stays on the hair shaft.  If you have been using commercial shampoos, which are basically detergents and surfactants & switch to a "soap".  The "buildup" on your hair is not being reinforced & your hair starts to look like crap as the coating breaks down.  Several companies make shampoos that remove residue.  I used to like the Neutrogena one until I gave up commercial shampoos entirely.

Water, also, plays an important role in good looking, healthy hair.  You are very lucky if you are starting with nice soft water to wash in.  My water is a nightmare of hardness & has a very high iron content.  I was shocked to find the pH out of my tap was around 10.

I find that soap for hair is different than soap for the body.  I usually would want things left on the skin for more protection & moisture and less running for the lotion, like a nice light coating of oils, some ingredients like sodium lactate or glycerin to act as a humectant & draw moisture to my skin.  I like milks, clays, oils with lots of unsaponifiable components and a decent superfat %.  This is NOT what I want in a shampoo bar.  I do not want much of anything that will leave deposits or a film on my hair.  It makes it dull & often, sticky.  I don't want any exfoliants on my hair as I am confused as to why anyone would want to sand the hair shaft to make it weaker & more easily broken or damaged.  I don't want anything TOO cleansing either, to strip off all the oils it is going to produce all next week.  Some people have success with a 100% coconut oil bar superfatted at 20%.  I don't think this would work for me, but I have not tried it.  Coconut oil soap is a great cleanser & WILL take most, if not all, of the oils out of your hair.  I use it at 0% superfat for laundry!  The 20% superfat added to the bar replaces the oil that the coconut soap stripped off.  Not what I want.

Each oil is made up of a variety of weak acids.  Oleic, linoleic & linolenic acids are the conditioning ones.  Of course, the bar has to be balanced & make some bubbles & stay hard enough to last at least a couple showers.  A lot of people use lard in their shampoo bars & are very happy with it.  I should get off my butt & make some so I can talk about it with first hand knowledge.  It is fantastic in body soap!

My good FB friend, ByrdiJean Zoricic turned me on to Canola oil.  This is called Rapeseed oil outside of the USA.  It has some super qualities for both body & hair soap.  It is high in all 3 of the above conditioning oils & contains less than 1.5% unsaponifiables.  This means it is going to be a marvel on my skin or hair but not leave behind a lot of oils or "stuff"  that is going to weigh down or grease up my hair.  Excellent!  Castor oil is notorious for skin & hair repair & is a wonderful nourishing oil.  It is the only oil that contains Ricinoleic acid which is also a conditioning acid.  It only contains 0.5-1% unsaponifiables.  Saponified, it also increases bubbles in your soap.  Coconut oil is a serious cleanser.  It strips oil off your skin/hair when saponified.  It makes super bubbles, can't beat it.  It also serves to harden the bars. 0.6-1.5% unsaps, too.  Mmmm, butters.  All creamy dreamy but not all created equally.  There are butters that are made from the item they are called after, like cocoa butter.  This is NOT a butter made with a bit of cocoa oil added to a lot of hydrogenated soy.  Mango, shea, peanut are all butters made from the item they are named after (there are more).  Things like cucumber butter are not "real" butters (as I define them).  They consist of a little cucumber oil or extract added to a hard oil like palm or soy shortening.  They are usually very expensive & if you really want them, you can make them at home & save some cash.  Mango has less than 0.7% unsaps & cocoa less than 0.8%.  Shea is different.  Refined shea has less than 1% unsaps while unrefined shea clocks in at between 6-17% or 9-13% unsaps recorded at 2 different test sources.  I like unrefined shea in my products but decided the unsaps in it were way too much for my hair to handle.

Sodium Lactate, can I say enough good stuff about this ingredient?  I see that most people use it to harden their bars of soap.  It does a great job at hardening.  I made some mainly lard soap that the edges were actually uncomfortable they were so hard, lol.  I was discussing this with my friend Byrdi who asked why don't I just pare or plane them off, hee hee, I love that woman, lol.  The easy fix worked well, lol.   I like SL because it is a serious humectant.  That means it draws moisture/water to itself.  An oil on your skin will create a barrier so your moisture will not evaporate, a humectant actually moisturizes by bringing moisture to your skin.  This is also very nice for hair.  Moisture with no grease, yay!  What could be better?

Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) is lovely stuff.  Commercial vinegar is normally reduced with water to 5% acidity.  I make my own vinegar & have no idea what the concentration of acid is.  I have made shampoo bars using ACV for 100% of the lye water.  It is at room temperature & you must add the lye slowly as it has a tendency to foam up.  The lye dissolves & the solution makes good soap without any outlandish calculations to compensate for anything.  Thank you Amy Anderson for being the fist person I know of to test this out.  There has been some active discussion about how the vinegar (as an acid) cuts down the effectiveness of the lye solution & yields a higher superfat than you anticipate.  This sounds logical, but I have not been able to detect too much superfat in the finished soaps.  Vinegar cuts soap scum (important for us hard water beauties).  It helps get rid of dandruff.  It somehow makes the shampoo bar milder, too.

Beer is another great hair tonic.  If I use beer for lye water, I am impatient.  Some people just open it & let it set to destroy the carbonation & evaporate some of the alcohol.  I like to simmer it.  When the volume is reduced to about 1/2 of what I started with, it's done.  Cool it off, measure & you can use it right away for your lye water.  Add lye slowly.  Beer is full of vitamins & antioxidants.  It softens, enriches & shines.

Of course these items are not the only good things for hair, or good things for shampoo bars, but I am really trying not to write a book, lol.

About the superfat in your shampoo bar.  Before I discovered that shampoos were not all created equally, I had dry, thin, limp hair.  I decided to change from the chemical laden soup I had been putting on my hair for years & switched to what I figured were healthier alternatives.  My hair was still dry, but much thicker & started actually having some body.  Because my hair was dry, I was under the false impression that I needed a hefty superfat.  I was very wrong!  I settled on 3% superfat, much lower than anything I would have used for a body soap.  You don't want your shampoo bar to make you look like you just crawled out of a swamp, but you don't want your hair so full of static it stands up by itself, either.  I started using shampoo bars that I was formulating about 7 months ago.  Some were pretty good, some were total flops.  I am not saying that the following recipe is the greatest shampoo ever created, but it has been working really well for me for the past 4-5 months.  One of my very first bars of soap was a vinegar bar.  I did not use it for the lye, but discounted the water & added the discounted amount back in ACV after the cook.  That bar is really nice, has a slickness I have not been able to duplicate any other way.  My hair is no longer dry!  If I go out to get my hair cut (I cut it a lot, myself), I am always complimented on how thick & healthy & shiny & what great condition my hair is in & how gawdawful fast it grows.  I guess I must be doing something right!

Herbal additives can be a benefit for hair.  I have been using Rosemary infused oil on my hair for about 40 yrs.  I had hair long enough to sit on for most of my life & Rosemary oil worked as a super detangler.  Just work a bit through the tangles & on the ends.  Rosemary also makes your hair shine, fights dandruff, & stimulates growth.  I decided to use infused olive oil for my superfat in the vinegar bars.  If I had Rosemary essential oil, I would have added that, too!

A recent post on a Facebook group mentioned adding Bergamot EO to a shampoo, for scent.  I did some research to see if there were any benefits for hair, or maybe some drawbacks.  It appears to be of great benefit to thin, dry hair that breaks.  It increases shine & can help make a protective barrier if you style your hair with heat.  If you have curls or frizzy hair this is the stuff you should try!  My friend Anita tested it on her hair.  She has a beautiful head of long curls that I'm sure can get pretty unruly & the weather can frizz that curly stuff up pretty good.  It was quite a successful test.  She loved what it did for her hair & it really looked lovely!  Check this out for more info:
Bergamot for your hair

I found this article a while back.  It lists some herbs & oils that benefit hair.  You may want to check it out:
natural-ways-to-make-hair-stronger-grow-and-shine-cover-grays-too/

Lizardlady's ACV Hot Process Shampoo Bar Recipe

This recipe is for 16 oz of oils.  With the liquids & lye it will be about 22-26 oz soap batter.  You can make this CP, CPOP, I've made it in the microwave.

Canola Oil       50%           8 oz
Coconut Oil     33%           5.28 oz
Castor Oil        7%             1.12 oz
Mango Butter   5%             0.8 oz
Cocoa Butter works well, too
Sunflower Oil    5%             0.8 oz

Melt the above oils together & cool a bit

ACV                 6.08 oz      (divide in 2 parts A 4.08 oz, B 2 oz)
ACV is Apple Cider Vinegar
Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)      2.39 oz
Sodium Lactate  5%             0.8 oz

Slowly add lye to 4.08 oz room temp ACV (or colder, temp not critical).  Stir to thoroughly dissolve the lye. Cool a bit.  When cool add Sodium Lactate & stir.

Add lye mixture to the oil mixture & make soap!

Superfat (your choice)
I used Rosemary infused Olive oil  3%        0.48 oz

Right before molding soap add superfat, any scent (hope you stick to EOs good for hair) & the 2 oz of ACV you saved out of the lye liquid.  Stir it up good & mold.
I always zap test my soap before I mold it but some people like to mess with strips or phenophthalein.  (that's another blog, lol).  You can scrape up the scraps out of the pot & go wash your hands to check out what you made, but it will be even better in a couple days.  Cut it or unmold it when it cools off.

I have had many people write & let me know they like this soap & it was made successfully.  I have had 2 people who did not have success with this recipe.  Both said they had crumbly soap.  One was a very new soap maker & that could have been from a lot of things.  The other was from an experienced soap maker which kinda bugged me as I do not now what the problem was.  She said the batch came out crumbly & with powdery layers.  I didn't get much technical info from her like the brand of vinegar, whether she stuck to the recipe.  She was concerned about the amount of Sodium Lactate & thought that was the culprit.  She had read that 3% was the max to use.  I have used 9% in recipes & had no problems.  I have to admit, I am not real critical about measuring THAT ingredient so no tellin how big a % I have actually used.  I love the stuff, lol.  Thanks Byrdi!  What would I do without your great ingredient suggestions?

ACV Rinse may be necessary if you have hard water.  It cuts the soap scum so it can rinse clean(er).  Put a bit of ACV in a plastic cup, fill with warm water, pour over your hair after your water rinse.  Don't leave it in as some suggest, make sure you rinse it well.  Leaving vinegar on your hair is just as bad as leaving soap scum on it.  Some people do not like the final rinse with ACV but prefer another type of vinegar, lemon juice or even citric acid.  Whatever works for you is good!  Your hair will also benefit if you can stand to do your final rinse with cool or even cold water.




Lizardlady's Dark Beer Hot Process Shampoo Bar Recipe

This recipe calls for 16 oz oils

Canola Oil        50%          8 oz
Coconut Oil      33%          5.28 oz
Castor Oil           7%          1.12 oz
Cocoa Butter       5%          0.8 oz
Hemp Oil             5%          0.8 oz

Melt the above oils together & cool a bit

Dark Beer 6.08 oz  I use Leinenkugel Creamy Dark, but any dark beer will work
Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)  2.393 oz  (67.84 grams)

Open a 12 oz bottle of the beer & simmer for about 10 minutes until volume is reduced by about 1/2.  Cool & measure the beer.  Make the weight up with distilled water to 6.08 oz

Slowly add the lye to the cooled beer.
After it is thoroughly dissolved & cooled, add to the lye solution

Sodium Lactate       5%          0.8 oz

Add lye mixture to your oils and make soap!

After cook add your superfats:

Hemp Oil                 1%           0.16 oz
Apricot Seed Oil      2%           0.32 oz
1 egg yolk

Separate egg, we are only using the yolk.  Mix the yolk into the superfats with a frother, or some other method to really incorporate it well.  When the soap is done cooking & it's time to add the superfats to the batter... wait.  Add about 1T of soap batter TO the superfats to temper the egg yolk so you don't get scrambled eggs in your soap.  After you have incorporated the bit of batter & your superfats you may want to add a bit more soap batter, then add the tempered superfats to the main soap batter & stir well to incorporate.
You do not HAVE to add the egg yolk but it sure makes a nice hair soap with it in there.

I have to admit, I made these with no scent & they do not smell so great.  You may want to add some of the EOs discussed above or pick your own, but make sure they are good for hair.  I love BOTH of these shampoo bars & alternate them as the mood strikes me.  I hope you enjoy them!







82 comments:

  1. Thank you - I have been looking for a vegan shampoo recipe. I will try this and may even sub out the ACV for home brewed beer:

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    1. Good sharing, yes, apple cider vinegar (ACV) helps to boost metabolism, blocks the body’s storage of dietary fat plus breaks down and dissolves existing body fat. A study at Australia’s University of Sydney in which subjects who consumed two tablespoon of ACV daily experienced fewer surges and crashes in blood sugar levels. Read more at:
      http://kidbuxblog.com/apple-cider-vinegar-acv-helps-to-boost-metabolism/

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  2. Glad to see you're up and running. I'm looking forward to reading!

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  3. Thanks, Liz! As another researcher ( I just can't stand not knowing, if info is available to me) I will be following your blog. I have always gotten so much out of what you share in the various groups & appreciate it immensely.

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  4. glad to see u blogging.. I was a bit nutty when making a shampoo bar before. I went to have my hair checked at the hair centre.. had my scalp magnify to check the extent of the dandruff and oily scalp. it was bad. and getting worse. the girl wash my hair and counted my hair that dropped.. I was horrified to find a lot of baby hairs which didn't even managed to grow. tat its I told myself. embark on a hair journey.. till today am not over yet.. after 5 months, I went back to another centre to have my scalp checked again.. didn't go back to the earlier centre because the hair treatment will cost me a bomb. I can handle the situation with my own shampoo bar.. yeah ..the dandruff is completely gone. the expert at the hair centre pointed out my black hair look very healthy, thick and well nourished. but the white hair remain the same as before except it look healthy. there are days , I would count the strand of hair after each daily wash.. and take a note of it.. its excellent.. no more baby hairs and hair count getting lesser and lesser everyday. now I have started another .. black hair oil

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  5. I have made your acv shampoo recipe and love the way it feels on my hair. It is the best by far of any recipe I have tried. Im sticking with this one from now on. Thamks again for sharing.

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  6. Wow!
    I just came across this article via Pinterest. I was like "yup, I wanna make a hair shampoo". I'm into soap making for 10 years now - in theory at least. I never dared trying for real... But I'm going to order some lye this spring.

    What a great article you write! Thanks for your effort and the detailed info you share! Really appreciated. Thank you.

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  7. hi, what EO are good for hair?

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  8. As I've mentioned on FB, not only do I love this shampoo bar for my hair, I also use it as a facial bar. No more adult acne and the bar is cleansing but never leaves my face feeling tight or dry. Love it!

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  9. Has anyone tried using flax seed oil in making shampoo bar? I heard it's good for smoother, shinier hair.

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  10. I don't have access to Sodium Lactate, do you think I it would be a good idea to incorporate some stearic acid in the recipe? thank you :D

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    1. I should say thank you for taking the time to write the posts because they are very informative! I felt in love <3

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    2. You can buy Sodium Lactate at Bulkapothecary.com it is relatively inexpensive, and a little goes a long way.

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    3. Natalia, no I would not put stearic acid in my soap for hair. If you cannot find sodium lactate, then just leave it out. It is in the recipe because it is a humectant. It is a nice addition but not a necessary ingredient

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    4. Honey is a good humiectant and good for your hair. but be cautious as it may speed up your trace in your soap.

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  11. What do you do with the part B - 2.0 oz of the ACV after you split it into two (A & B)

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  12. Dear Liz, I made your first shampoo. Now I am encouraged to do the other one with the beer. But unfortunately I don't have apricot oil and hemp. Can I substitute with anything else? Will be much obliged for answer.

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    1. You can do substitutions but it WILL change the bar. Olive oil is a nice safe oil for hair. If I was forced to sub something for those I guess it would be olive. I found small bottles of both at my local health food store.

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  13. Wow! That is such an interesting article, I'll have to come back and read it again and again, for the pleasure of learning. Thank you for your generosity, you may have contributed to solve one of my biggest quest : hair + natural + not looking like a zombie!

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  15. I need a recipe for dry coarse curly hair extra coarse because I have 50%grey I have almond oil 3oz Olive oil coconut oil palm oil castor oil avacado butter and Shea butter I have pepper mint and rosemary essential oil I just don't know the right percentage to use to get a good shampoo bar help please Karon.webb@gmail.com

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  16. Can I use Palm oil instead of sodium lactate and how much if I can

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    1. Palm oil is completely different than sodium lactate. They would not be a substitute for each other. Sodium Lactate is a liquid salt that is naturally derived from the natural fermentation of sugars found in corn and beets.

      Palm oil is an oil.

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    2. Palm oil is completely different than sodium lactate. They would not be a substitute for each other. Sodium Lactate is a liquid salt that is naturally derived from the natural fermentation of sugars found in corn and beets.

      Palm oil is an oil.

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    3. Sodium lactate is not a critical ingredient. Do not sub anything for it, just leave it out :)

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  17. I made the first shampoo bar recipe on this page, and ended up with slightly crumbly bars. The entire loaf cracked horizontally down the middle as I cut it, and there are small cracks throughout the bars.

    I did modify the recipe slightly. My MIL wanted a shampoo bar using avocado because it is supposed to be good for dandruff prevention and hair growth. I used 30% Avocado oil and 20% Canola oil. I used Cocoa butter instead of mango, and added 1oz of avocado ppo and 1 tbs sugar ppo.

    This was my first shampoo bar, and I cooked it in a crock pot. It took longer than my other soap recipes, I think because it contained more liquid oils (I usually do 50% lard).

    I waited a little more than 24 hrs before cutting it after putting it in the mold, and it was a bit crumbly. I had excess soap when I was molding the loaf so I made one bar in an individual soap mold, and that bar came out well.

    I will try this recipe again without modifications. If someone is having the problem of crumbly bars they can probably use individual molds to avoid the problem. It is possible that if I would have cut the bars sooner, they might not have cracked.

    I was also thinking about the ACV in this recipe. I wonder if the acid does neutralize a bit of the lye so that the bars end up being superfatted more than 3% in the end (but we don't know by how much). I have a PhD in Biology and took a lot of chem classes, but I am not an expert on this.

    I want to mention that even though my bars cracked they seem to work well and I will try the recipe as written to see if they come out differently. Thanks so much for the recipes and sharing your knowledge!

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Did you adjust your lye amount to calculate for the change in oils? If you didn't, it is possible that you created a lye heavy soap that was crumbly (an potentially unsafe for use). If the lye amounts were right, what comes to mind is a problem with the soap setting while molding, creating gaps and separate layers.

      One reason for hot process soap cracking can be that you let it cool too much before molding and/or too much of the water cooked out. Sometimes it starts drying as you put it in the mold and the layers don't "stick" - for lack of a better word.

      Newbie hack to prevent this would be to add some extra water and mix it in before pouring it into mold and/or spritz with alcohol if you think the soap in mold is already drying when you are putting in more soap.

      A method that won't add to your drying time, but takes something of a confident hand is to pour all/most your soap "batter" into the mold in one big lump directly from the crockpot while it is slightly on the warm side.

      Using both methods - adding some water as well as molding before the soap cools too much can give you a soap that is workable enough to even do swirls!!! I have done this quite a few times and while not as easy as swirling cold process, it is very doable if you have an eye on how liquid the soap should be and mold before it gets too thick.

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    3. Many people tend to overcook this recipe, but I think your problem was waiting to cut the loaf. I have tried the ACV recipe in a slab & cut it when it was still warm with no cracking or crumbling. I cannot duplicate the crumbling that some people get when making this recipe, but I suspect it is not a great recipe for a loaf... or cutting in general. The ACV combined with the lye will react to form a bit of sodium acetate (acetic acid + sodium hydroxide). I'm glad to hear you will try the recipe without modifications. The avocado oil is rather high in unsaponifiables which may give you the "feel"of a higher superfat. The high unsaps is also why I do not recommend unrefined shea.

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  19. I just ordered Sodium Lactate 60% from WSP, couldn't find anything else. Is that the right thing? Yup, I'm a newbie, don't know if there are other concentration levels to choose from? Can't wait to make this bar! Thanks.

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  20. Hi! I'm curious about something. Vinegar deactivates lye. Does the ACV not deactivate it? Thanks!

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    1. The ACV is about 4-5% acetic acid swimming around in 95% water. The acetic acid reacts with the sodium hydroxide to make a bit of sodium acetate. No, vinegar does NOT deactivate lye, it is much too weak :)

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  21. Hi ... This is was sooo informative ... Do u also have a shampoo bar recipe for oily hair ?

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    1. Same recipe. Your scalp should regulate the oil production as it gets used to the shampoo. First few times you use it you may want to lather 2X. Try it and see how it works for you. If you are still oily after giving it a chance, you can always cut back on the % of superfat or change the oil. I DO recommend olive oil for superfat. It seems to be just the right touch for me & most other people I have heard from.

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  22. Hi
    I'm going to try this recipe, just wondering how long they need to cure before using?

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    1. Hot process soap should be safe to use as soon as you make it. It is my habit to take scrapings from the pot, or the spoons I used, after I mold the soap, while the batter is still hot & take it to the sink to check the lather. I COULD also use it to wash my hair but I have always waited for a bar :) When they stop losing weight, the water has fully evaporated & they will be "ideal" at that time, meaning they will last as long as they can in the shower. Fresh soap that still contains a lot of water or liquid seems to melt faster when wet.

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  23. Can I substitute something for the canola?

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  24. Great blog, I like you Liz Ardlady - I must point out that canola was coined by the Rapeseed Association of Canada in the 1970s, so in Canada we also call it canola, which is wise when you think about the high incidence of sexual assault. It's probably best not to cling to a name which is also a violent and disturbing crime which often goes unpunished (imho)!

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  25. I tried this recipe for the first time! Everything went PERFECT! I poured it into a loaf mold, waited 24 hours and cut it! It was not crumbly or anything! Cut very easily. Now the hard part....waiting to use it! Can...not...wait!!!

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    1. Did you use hp method? if so how long did you cook it for? Thank you!

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  26. Can i cold process this recipe

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  27. I saw a youtube video of someone making what seemed like a hot process soap, but when she was at the final stage,she added a lot of water (not sure how much, seemed like maybe 100% of what she had in her crockpot)and then she let it sit overnight. After adding some sort of a thickener she had a liquid shampoo. Would it be possible to make a liquid using your recipe? Of course I would also have to add a preservative.

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  28. Hi, thanks for your recipes. If there is ACV in the soap then why do you need an ACV rinse ?

    Cheers,
    Céline

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  29. Hi, thanks for your recipes. If there is ACV in the soap then why do you need an ACV rinse ?

    Cheers,
    Céline

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  30. I am very impressed with your page… It’s very usefull… Keep it up…. Thanks..Fatty Acid Assay Kit

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  32. I made this and used the 3 pound version, so glad that I did because it's so great! I've made some good shampoo bars but this is my new favorite. For the person who asked, my bars are not at all crumbly. Thanks for sharing.

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  33. I made this and used the 3 pound version, so glad that I did because it's so great! I've made some good shampoo bars but this is my new favorite. For the person who asked, my bars are not at all crumbly. Thanks for sharing.

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  34. Can I make this using Cold Press instead of HP? Thank you.

    *I'm new in soap making*

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  35. I liked your post its really helpful. But I have tried several hair oils to reduce the dryness of my hair. Ervamatin Hair lotion is great because this offers me great hair benefits. This oil is wonderful I have used it and it does wonders to my hair! must try this...http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=182249335979

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  36. The shampoo is great for my very fine and thinning hair.
    I was going to give some to a friend. She questioned if it is safe for colored hair. I don't see why not, but told her I would check with the author of the recipe.

    I dissolve some in bottled water which gives me liquid shampoo. Ho rubbing the bar on my scalp. Lots of great suds. Thanks for the recipe.

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    1. Did you find this was okay for colored hair? I have tried half a dozen different recipes, and all of them wind up stripping my color :(

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  37. How Long to cook as a hot process soap Thank you for this recipe!

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  41. thank you so much for this recipe! I'm a new soap maker, but have made 2 batches of shampoo bars recently.so my question is....in the acv recipe it says to mix the oils/lye mix, make soap....then add superfat. what does that mean? I understand the superfat, but I thought the oilsin the first stage were calculated to include superfat? if not, how much and which old do we add at this point? thanks so much!!!

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  42. thank you so much for this recipe! I'm a new soap maker, but have made 2 batches of shampoo bars recently.so my question is....in the acv recipe it says to mix the oils/lye mix, make soap....then add superfat. what does that mean? I understand the superfat, but I thought the oilsin the first stage were calculated to include superfat? if not, how much and which old do we add at this point? thanks so much!!!

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  43. Thank you so much for the recipe..Very tempting to try. It was a big no for shampoo bar till i saw this recipe. One doubt : which brand of ACV you used in the recipe. will any do anything in particular like Bragg's?

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  44. Excellent, thanks so much for sharing :D

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  45. Hi, I have three questions. I don't have sodium lactate- can I make this soap recipe without it? I have vegetable glycerin, which I know is a humectant. Can that be used instead? This will only be my second time making a shampoo bar so I don't know much about it yet!
    My 2nd question is, I want to use jojoba oil in this shampoo bar. I'm thinking I should reduce either the coconut or canola oil a bit so I can add the jojoba. Which one do you think I should use less of?
    And last, I've been toying with using aloe juice instead of water for my next batch, and I also like the idea of using acv. Can I use half and half or do you think they won't work well together?
    Thanks! I've been using shampoo bars for awhile now but I'm just getting started making my own. My first batch worked great at first, but now my hair and scalp feel like they did that time I tried making my own castile based liquid shampoo- dry and itchy!

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    1. update: I made a half batch to try it and it is working great on my hair! I used half acv half aloe juice for the lye solution, and used jojoba oil as the superfat. I've been using it for less than a month and my scalp is almost healed from my first failed attempt at a shampoo bar.
      I was using an acv rinse every time, but I think it was drying my hair out, so the last two times I washed I didn't use it. I am using a conditioner bar by beauty and the bees, which I love! My next project will be to figure out how to make my own conditioner bar. :)

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  47. Hey,you know how healthy is it to consume canola?

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  48. For Cold Process, when do you add in the ACV? Thanks!

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    1. I want to know this, too. Anything else I need to know to make this CP?

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  49. I would love to make a shampoo bar. These shampoo bars are they for dry hair or normal?
    Thanks Henrietta

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  50. Would love to try one of these shampoo bars. Is both recipes for normal hair or even people with oily hair can use it?

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  51. Hi
    I'm wondering if I can substitute red wine vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar
    Thanks

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  53. Hi Liz, today I made your recipe of dark beer and egg shampoo bar but CP. poured into individual cavities, sprayed with alcohol and waited. Couple of hours later the bars were sweating not with water but oil! I used bergamot and Rosemary EOs. Help!

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  54. What % do you SF your shampoo bars at? I am a little confused from your explanation. I've been supper fatting mine at 10% and it seems to be going fairly well.

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  55. Hello, I am a rookie shampoo bar maker, at best. I tried the hot process and believe that I did not cook the shampoo long enough before putting my ingredients in the molds. They are very clear and oily still. Am I able to salvage the ingredients and recook it? Thanks for your help.

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  56. What is super fast please explain idont know what to add as in superfat

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